RAMBA

FEMALE ASIAN ELEPHANT

WAITING FOR SANCTUARY

Ramba's 50-Years of Loneliness Is Nearly Over!

Ramba is one of the sweetest elephants you will ever meet. But as cooperative and loving as she is, she has never fully come out of her shell. She rumbles and lets out an occasional trumpet, but hasn’t vocalized otherwise. As we saw with Rana, sometimes it takes feeling secure, confident, and the companionship of other elephants to find your voice. We look forward to discovering whether Ramba is a squeaker, makes raspberry noises, or prefers whale songs or one of the many other sounds Asian elephants make.

There is also a lot of emotional growth that Ramba will experience. She loves human companionship but doesn’t desire human touch. We witnessed her open up once, to Scott, many years ago. During this one moment where she completely let her guard down, she leaned into her pets and opened up to all of the affection he offered. Two hours later, when he approached again, she was back to her reserved self. Ramba needs a quiet place, one where she feels safe and is not on display, where she is surrounded by others of her kind who truly understand her and can help her to open her heart fully- she needs sanctuary.

Ramba’s Flight Cost
$125,000

Ultimeter custom progress meter.

raised to date

Our thanks to all who donated and shared to fund her flight costs!

Her Herd Awaits

Many of us have been waiting for the day Ramba’s permits went through. Now it’s time for us to come together and bring her home. Her days of grasping at trees just out of reach are almost over, and you can make her life at the sanctuary a reality. No one will ever replace Guida, but we are hoping that Ramba’s grounded and wise nature will bring back a little of what the herd lost. Ramba and all of us, elephant and human, could use encouragement to take that next step in healing.

Please help us finally provide Ramba with the life she has been waiting for.

AirRamba Campinas map

Ramba's Rescue Status & FAQ

Agreement Signed

Done.  The Judge order to send her to ESB has been completed.

Habitat Constructed

Done.  She will share a space with Maia, and Rana.

Brazilian License Obtained

Done

CITES Permit

CITES import permit approved
CITES export permit from Chile in process

Quarantine Training

Done

30-Day In-House Quarantine

Not yet begun

Why is Ramba being flown, wouldn’t driving cost less?

Ramba needs to be flown due to the proximity of her current location to the Andes Mountain Range. There is no way around it and the drive through it would be too dangerous for a truck with a 10,000 lb. crate carrying a 8,500 lb. elephant. It would also add more paperwork and legal issues because Ramba would need permits to drive through additional countries. With flying, permits are only needed for Brazil and Chile.

How long is the journey?

The drive within Chile will take just a few hours, the flight to Brazil is listed as 4 hours. Then the drive to sanctuary will take about two and a half days. In total, Ramba’s transit time will be less than Rana’s, as long as all of the transfers go well. Loading her on and off of the trucks/plane will take time and there are several stops that will have to be made to check her import/export paperwork and pay fees. We hope to once again have the help of the Brazilian police to make the ground transport within the country as smooth as possible.

Will Ramba be alone in the plane?

No, we are submitting an official request for two jump seats, so Scott and our veterinarian can be on the plane with her. They will bring an emergency medical kit with them, just in case.

Can’t someone fly her for free?

Believe us, we tried. We approached numerous different airlines, the military, delivery services and even a Rockstar with his own plane. Either they didn’t have a plane large enough for the crate to fit through the doorway, or they weren’t willing to offer their services for free or even at a discount. Numerous supporters also tried to help with their own contacts, all to no avail. The route she will fly is not one used by transport companies, so the cost is essentially for her own flight.

Will Ramba’s caregivers be going with her?

Her caregivers will have the opportunity to fly and meet her in Brazil so they can see her in her new home and help with her adjustment if needed. But Ramba does know both Scott and Kat, who rescued her from the circus seven years ago. Both spent several months getting her comfortable in her new home and returned at different points during her time there.

Will Ramba be frightened in the plane?

It’s impossible to say. Ramba was a circus elephant for 40 years and is no stranger to transport. Flying is a little different, but like humans, most anxiety comes with taking off and landing, when things feel strange. Ramba has always been a very grounded elephant, so we are hoping she feels no more stress than we all do when flying. We will use some flower essences (think Bach’s Rescue Remedy) and essential oils to help keep her calm and comfortable, but will also have prescription drugs on hand if needed.

Will Ramba be sedated for travel?

No. We never sedate elephants for transport. Because of their sensitivity and intelligence, we have found they do much better when they are alert and aware of everything going on around them. Scott has transported over 35 elephants in his career, none were sedated, and all went well.

What is the cost?

The approximate cost for her entire rescue looks to be around $250,000 at this point. We are waiting for two more quotes, that won’t arrive until next week. We have been talking to these companies for some time, but their prices have changed since we last spoke. We do have some of that money already raised, but that amount needs to be adjusted because three large donors allowed us to divert their gifts to other immediate needs when Ramba’s future seemed uncertain. We hope to have all of the numbers solidified within two weeks, and we will update this page with those when we do. This cost includes sending her transport crate to Chile along with all of those fees and taxes, Ramba’s ground and air transportation, import fees, crane rental in both countries (twice in Chile), airfare for our team to get to Ramba, rental cars and necessities for the team once in Brazil for the drive to sanctuary, and the many other bits and pieces required to rescue an elephant. We are still trying two last organizations to request funding, but know that chances are our amazing supporters will be the ones bringing Ramba home.

What training is required?

Ramba has already been trained for the testing that will take place during her 30-day required quarantine. Ramba will have some time to be introduced to her crate, (the same one used for our other rescues) but as many of you saw who followed along with Rana’s rescue, it generally takes only a few days for them to become acclimated. Ramba will have additional time, to make sure it all goes smoothly. But with her existing trust in her caregivers and Scott, we hope it is fairly straightforward.

When will she meet Maia and Rana?

As always, we mostly leave that up to them. We like to give new arrivals at least one night to rest well after their journey before we begin introductions. It will depend on how Ramba is doing and how she feels, along with where Maia and Rana are and how interested they are to come to meet their new sister. Everything functions on their time- no expectations, no set schedules.

If we haven’t answered your question here, please feel free to contact us at Kat@GlobaleElephants.org

Ramba's General Information

Age

Estimated at 53 years old (no official records)

Current Location

Roadside Zoo in Chile 7 years (only elephant)

Personality

 Easy breezy, very grounded, but not interested in physical affection

History

Ex-circus elephant 40 years (alone most of her life)

Health

Pre-existing kidney and liver issues, but doing very well. Stable

Body Condition

Kept a little chunky for health reasons

Factoid

Very rumbly, likes standing on her fence to eat willows just out of reach

A Way to Support Ramba

Donate Now

Help Us Care for Sweet Ramba

After 40 years on circus and seven years waiting at a roadside zoo for a better life to come along, Ramba is finally coming home. You can be a part of ensuring that not only is she emotionally and mentally nurtured but that her aging body is taken the best care of as well.